Nature-like Fishing Platforms

As a result of the habitat enhancement and bank reprofiling carried out earlier in the year, some areas of the new banks are slightly wetter than I would like them to be. The wet summer and the fact that this is only the first year of vegetation growth on them means that there isn’t a lot of support in the margins from the root structure.

This is good for the aquatic environment, as it provides that semi-wetland marginal habitat for reeds and marginal plants which in turn provide marginal cover for juvenile fish, invertebrates and small mammals (including, unfortunately, my nemesis – the mink!).

However, it does mean that the banks are starting to erode and become very boggy in areas where the rods like to fish from, which is only going to increase through the winter with the limited vegetation dying off and the expected higher water levels. So I came up with a solution – build some nature-like fishing platforms which would be in keeping with the natural banks whilst providing some firmer areas to fish from and prevent the boggy areas from getting worse. This method of building them works well on steeply or gently sloping banks, but on steep banks some digging will be needed to be able to key the sides of the platform back into the bank, whilst ensuring the actual platform is more or less horizontal and level.

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To do the work I needed the following:

10 x        6ft untreated pointed Chestnut stakes (half round / quarter round) 3-4”

1 x           Reel of 2mm galvanised fencing wire

1 x           Willow trunk approximately 8ft long by 2ft diameter

2 x           Willow trunk approximately 5ft long by 2ft diameter

2 x           8ft Hazel faggot bundles

Tools     Chainsaw, post rammer, post maul, claw hammer, 40mm fencing staples, shovel, large pry bar, fencing pliers, 150mm hex head decking screws, battery electric drill.

In addition to the above, a tractor with a front loader for moving the trunks and an excavator to level the bank slightly / dig the trunks in would have been helpful. I would normally have scraped out trenches for the trunks, but the ground was so wet I didn’t want to risk it! I have to say though, please don’t use any of the kit unless you are suitably experienced and trained and have the correct protection.

I started off by selecting a good site for the platform – in this case behind a hinged willow branch, where the ground is soft and immediately upstream of a nice gravel run alongside a reed bed that looks like an ideal glide for summer barbel. I knocked in three of the chestnut stakes to make the front edge of the platform (the stakes need to be spaced out to the length of the longest tree trunk you are going to use, in my case around 8ft long).

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I then scraped a shallow trench behind the stakes, wide enough to lay two 8ft long hazel faggots in. I used faggots rather than just placing the trunk in straight on the mud to prevent it sinking over time, and also allowing the vegetation to grow out through the faggots along the front of the platform next year.

I risked getting the tractor close enough to roll the main 8ft long trunk off the log grab and onto the top of the faggots, and squashed it down with the front loader before trimming the end to suit with the chainsaw.

A fourth post was added in the middle on the rear of the trunk (the inside of the platform) to allow it to be wired down (only in the middle, you’ll see why later) and then the middle posts knocked in some more to hold the trunk down to the ground and prevent movement. Tourniquet the wire up and then staple it to the posts as low down as possible. The posts can then be knocked in some more using the post maul to tighten the wire and pull the trunk down flush with the ground / faggot bundles underneath.

I also used a 150mm decking screw through each of the posts for added security before cutting the top of the posts off as low down as I could. In hindsight, with the wire I wish I had cut a small groove across the top of the trunk with the chainsaw to allow the wire to lie flush – I can see landing net mesh catching on it in the future!

The two sides of the platform were made up from the two remaining shorter (5ft) trunks set a right angles back from the main trunk, and I scraped out the area they would lie in by hand to make them lie more or less level. A stake at each end on the outside and one in the middle on the inside works pretty well. The stake on the inside won’t be seen or above the ground once the platform is infilled anyway, so it doesn’t matter.

I then wired across the trunks from end to middle to end on each one, knocked a fencing staple into each post to hold the wire and knocked the posts down some more with the post maul to secure them, before cutting the posts off as low as possible with the chainsaw.

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Essentially, the platform is more or less complete now – I tided the corners on mine up with the chainsaw because I was feeling pedantic. The platform can then be infilled with some decent firm material (Type 1 or scalpings will work well) which can be blended back into the natural bank, but will still ‘green up’ with vegetation. I shall probably use a layer of geotextile (coir matting) inside the platform as a retaining ‘bag’ to prevent the material from being washed out in the event of high flows over the winter. However, the infilling can wait until the ground is dry enough to back the tractor trailer down the bank without causing too much damage to the ground.

Another method of finishing the platform is to use some timber (old scaffold boards, decking boards or 12″ x 2″ boards) across the top to create a decking effect and screw each one down to the trunks with a void underneath. However, I shall infill this one as I would like it to look as unobtrusive and natural as possible.

I shall let you know how it fares!

ACC.

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